Just Another Day At The Plant!

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Hi Guys

Well today started out with taking some of my dahlias which I grew from seed and some of my overwintered geraniums to a couple of neighbours and planted them into their gardens and pots.

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Then it was back to the tunnels to sow some spicy salad leaves, lettuce and spinach as the warm weather had sent some of the spicy salad ‘sky high’ (bolt). I sowed some lollo rossa, romaine, nymans and a mixed lettuce called all sorts, along with some organic rocket, bright and spicy, oriental leaves and mustard.

Spicy Salad and Lettuce can very easily bolt (go to seed) if it gets too hot which can be a problem the cover of a poly tunnel :(

Spicy Salad and Lettuce can very easily bolt (go to seed) if it gets too hot which can be a problem under the cover of a poly tunnel ūüė¶

Rocket can also bolt but the flowers make really nice addition to your salad bowl :)

Rocket can also bolt but the flowers make really nice addition to your salad bowl ūüôā

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also gave the tomatoes a good pruning by pinching out, side shooting and getting rid of those suckers ūüôā from the indeterminate tomato plants and gave them and all the other veg a good watering and feed.

These are the Tamina tomato plants.  They have leaves that are more like a potato than a tomato.  They are a great plant and give a high yield of medium sized fruits.

These are the Tamina tomato plants. They have leaves that are more like a potato than a tomato. They are a great plant and give a high yield of medium sized fruits.

This is a Black Russian Tomato Plant which produces massive deep purple/black fruits

This is a Black Russian Tomato Plant which produces massive deep purple/black fruits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love my tomato plants but the side shooting/suckering is a long job when you have well over a 100 plants. I use the velcro garden tape which makes tying them up a much easier job.

Love my tomato plants but the side shooting/suckering is a long job when you have well over a 100 plants. I use the velcro garden tape which makes tying them up a much easier job.

 

 

 

I have been working on my video about the chili/pepper plants and hopefully will upload it tomorrow but I have had a few technical issues with my computer which hopefully is now sorted so stay tuned!

Happy Gardening

 

Eve

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Poly Tunnels and Multi Tasking!

Well hello there,

Yesterday was another one of those days when, as a woman I had to multitask. ¬†My son is home from university for the summer and along with him came loads of washing – 5 machine loads to be precise! ¬† I am more than happy to do his washing for him as I do miss him when he is away. ¬†This was his 1st year at uni and I think I was more worried than he was ūüėČ ¬†So I was in and out of the utility with the washing and as it looked like it was going to rain I hung the clothes out to dry….in my tunnel, another great reason to use one of these great multi functional tunnels ūüėČP1000990

 

Along with doing the washing I had to get my seaweed into all the different places that I had for it. ¬†First was to tuck my tomato plants into their seaweed bed, but before that I needed to stake the tomatoes and also start to ‘pinch out’ the side shoots and this is quite a time consuming job when you have 150 tomato plants to do. ¬†Once this job was done, I could lay the seaweed around them and hopefully keep any fungal viruses and those nasty pests like slugs well away from my crops ūüôā

After mulching your tomatoes with seaweed, remember to leave a space for walking on clear, otherwise you will be slip sliding all over the place.

After mulching your tomatoes with seaweed, remember to leave a space for walking on clear, otherwise you will be slip sliding all over the place.

Remember to stake your tomatoes and attach carefully with some garden velcro or similar.

When you have your stake in place you will need to attach the tomato plants to them carefully with some garden velcro or similar.

This plant has a really long side shoot.  Remember to take a good look at the plant to work out which is the main stem before pinching out the side shoot!!

This plant has a really long side shoot. Remember to take a good look at the plant to work out which is the main stem (shown here in the picture) before pinching out the side shoot!!

The side shoot should break away quite easily by gently pulling it towards you.

The side shoot should break away quite easily by gently pulling it towards you.

 

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Then onto the bins to make up my seaweed fertilizer.  As you will see from the photos I use good old fashioned household bins with lids and get my very handy husband to put taps into the bottom.  Remember to raise the bins up before filling them otherwise you will find it very difficult to get your liquid seaweed out of the tap.

Good old fashioned garden bins make great compost/fertilizer bins. Also remember to raise them up so you can put a container under the bin to collect your liquid

Good old fashioned garden bins make great compost/fertilizer bins. Also remember to raise them up so you can put a container under the bin to collect your liquid

 

Fill your bin with about 2/3 of fresh water then fill up with your seaweed

Fill your bin with about 2/3 of fresh water then fill up with your seaweed

Taps are readily available in any good garden center or DIY.  You can however buy compost bins which have the taps already on but they are pretty pricey!!

Taps are readily available in any good garden center or DIY. You can however buy compost bins which have the taps already on but they are pretty pricey!!

 

Last but not least I put a couple of wheel barrow loads of seaweed into the compost heap. I will put a pile of straw on top of it today or it will end up a slimy mess ūüôā

So lets check what we achieved yesterday: Tomatoes staked….check, Tomatoes ‘pinched out’ and tied to their stakes….check, seaweed mulch around tomatoes….check, pot on the peppers……NOT DONE but today is another day ūüôā

Even Buddy was bored today and thought that I would never get finished ;)

Even Buddy was bored yesterday and thought that I would never get finished ūüėČ

Thanks for tuning in and happy gardening.

Eve

Seaweed-one of natures free fertilizers

P1000974Hi Guys

Well today turned out to be slightly different from planned which happens quite a lot in my world. ¬†I’m not complaining as life can be more exciting (sometimes) when you do things on a ‘whim’. ¬†Today we woke up to sunshine, although a little cold as we have a northerly wind but decided it was a perfect morning to collect seaweed for the garden. It’s a great FREE ¬†organic fertilizer, mulch and can also be used as pest control.

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Seaweed is so good for the garden soil and plants due to the amazing amount of trace elements (these are the nutrients that plants only need a little of), potassium, magnesium, growth hormones, nutrients, and anti fungal and disease elements.

If you are not lucky enough to live close to the sea and collect seaweed fresh, don’t panic as seaweed can be used in its natural form or as a powder or liquid fertilizer and is available in most good garden centers. It can be used as a foliage spray on both plants and seedlings. ¬†It can help prevent disease (mold and fungus growth), act as a growth simulator, due to the micro nutrients and help set ¬†fruits. ¬†To make your own ¬†seaweed fertilizer you will need to fill a bucket or barrel to 3/4 full with fresh water. ¬†Add as much seaweed as you need to fill it up and leave to soak for at least 6 weeks, ¬†even several months stirring every few days. It is best to keep it somewhere ‘out of the way’ as it will smell pretty bad for a while. ¬†It is ready to use when it no longer ‘stinks’. ¬†It should be diluted before you use it, at least a minimum of 3-4 parts of water to 1 part of ¬†seaweed fertilizer.

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Seaweed also works as a great mulch and unlike other ground cover mulch at often make a great hiding place for slugs, snails, earwigs and other little pests, the seaweed is both salty and as it dries it crisps up and makes it very uncomfortable for these horrid little critters to crawl on.  It is also great as a weed suppressant and any weeds that do manage to pop up above the seaweed can be easily seen and destroyed.

Seaweed is also great for the compost heap as it helps to condition your compost with trace elements so that when you use it in your garden you are getting the benefit both from the mulch and the compost. I would advise you to mix it with such materials as straw, paper or dried leaves when composting, otherwise it will become very slimy and leave your compost pile smelling rancid.

Seaweed is also great for the garden if you haven’t got time for manure to age, as seaweed can be used straight away and dug into the soil before planting up your fruit and veg.

We collected a couple of trailers full of seaweed today, with the help of one of our dogs Tilly, she not only loves the beach, but loves water:)

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Tomorrow I will put some seaweed around my tomato plants, put some into a barrel for fertilizer and some onto the compost heap….and maybe get some of the other jobs done that I had initially planned for today ūüėČ

Thanks for tuning in and happy gardening.

Take Care

Eve

 

 

 

 

LOVE THIS TIME OF YEAR!

Hi Guys I love this time of year, the days are longer, the sun is high enough to stay above the mountain facing us and follows the ridge all the way down into the ocean before it disappears for a few hours. Another busy day in the tunnels today, not sure which way to turn as there is still so much to do but its keeps me out of mischief ūüėČ ¬†First thing this morning I decided to pick some more strawberries from the 125 strawberry plants that I have growing this year….from 12 plants that were grown last year ( I will show you exactly how to do this in another post coming up soon). ¬†So I started to pick my lovely red strawberries but as I went along the bed I began to get more and more disappointed as there were so many ripe fruits that had gone rotten ūüė¶ ¬†I knew the reason for this was the fact that the bad ones were lying on the damp soil and should have put straw around them when I first planted them…..I forgot, or should I say, I was too busy doing other stuff. ¬†Anyway I knew if I was going to get a good yield ¬†from my strawberry bed I needed to do something before I lost more yummy fruit, so with the help of my hubby we carefully covered the soil around the strawberries with….yep…straw. ¬†Very fiddly job when there are so many mature plants. ¬†My advise is that you do this job when you first plant them, which is what I should have done!

Great bed of strawberries but having to throw a lot away due to the fruits lying on damp soil.....They need tucking into a nice straw bed!

Great bed of strawberries but having to throw a lot away due to the fruits lying on damp soil…..They need tucking into a nice straw bed!

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Nicely tucked into their new straw bed ūüôā P1000934 ¬† Once I had that job out of the way I decided that I needed to tidy up a little, especially as I fell over the hose yesterday ūüė¶ ¬†I also planted on the courgettes in between the corn and beans (three sisters) and have a baby courgette already.

Courgettes are coming on nicely

Courgettes are coming on nicely

The lettuce has settled down now and is over the transplant shock. Also the flower hanging baskets, of which I have done 15 for both friends and myself are starting to look really good. ¬†I will keep them in the tunnel for a couple of weeks so that when they finally go outside they will be in full bloom. P1000936 Tomorrow will once again be a busy day. ¬†I have to transplant my peppers into larger pots, plant some more potatoes, transplant some more salad seedlings into cell trays and stake my tomato plants….not much really ūüėČ P1000960P1000956

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Thanks for tuning and happy gardening.

Take Care

Eve

Tomato Growing Problems And How To Control Them

P1020256Tomatoes are one of my favourite foods to grow (just in case you didn’t know!) and I really look forward to the taste of my home-grown tomatoes after waiting patiently for months on end and giving them all the care and attention that they need!

Unfortunately if you dont look after your tomato plants, you are going to get all sorts of pests and diseases which could destroy all your hard work. However, there will be times when, despite you giving your tomato plants all the care and attention that they need, the weather and other environmental stresses which are out of your control, can affect the health of your plants.

There are many types of problems that may affect your tomatoes, BUT…….we can, by taking a few precautionary measures avoid them and hopefully make your growing experience of this delicious fruit a great success.

Here are some of the most common tomato problems; I hope that this will help you to diagnose what the culprit is and treat it as early as possible to prevent it from spreading to other plants.

BOTRYTIS (GREY MOULD)

Botrytis or Grey mould (Botrytis cinerea) can be a serious problem when you get it in on your poly tunnel or greenhouse tomato plants.¬†Grey mould thrives under cool, wet conditions (high humidity) and often establishes itself on dead or dying plants, including the leaves, flowers, stems and unfortunately the tomatoes. ¬†It usually attacks unhealthy¬†(stressed) plants but it can also infect perfectly healthy specimens too. ¬†Tomatoes which are grown too close together (overcrowded) ¬†will also be more susceptible – GUILTY ūüė¶

The first symptom of Botrytis is a fuzzy grey mould which can often be missed (as I did this year ūüė¶ ) and if not spotted early ¬†can very quickly spread to other tomato plants as well as a variety of other fruit, veg and flowers, such as strawberries, beans, cucumbers, courgettes, lettuce, ,marigolds, aubergines, blackberries, raspberries, gooseberries and many more – ¬†too many to name. ¬†This grey mould is made up of dry spores that are air-borne. ¬†These spores are dispersed very easily by the wind, garden tools, particularly your pruning shears, scissors etc. ¬†If one part of the plant is infected, ie: if a flower that is infected drops off onto a leaf, then the leaf will become infected. If a fruit that is infected touches another part of the plant, then that will become infected too – ¬†In other words it is very very contagious and once it gets hold it is very hard to control.

Botrytis can survive/overwinter in the soil and plant debris so it is really important to NOT use the same area the following year, this is important for all garden vegetables and is called crop rotation.   It is also important to dispose of all infected debris and fruits carefully and  DO NOT put them into your compost heap.

HOW TO PREVENT THE ONSET OF BOTRYTIS (Before it takes hold!)

First things first.  The MOST important thing and number one on the list is to make sure that your greenhouse/glasshouse, poly tunnel is kept clean and thoroughly disinfect it every year, moreoften if possible.

As Botrytis is caused by cool, wet conditions and high humidity, you should avoid planting your tomatoes too close together (GUILTY ūüė¶ ). ¬†Remove lower leaves as soon as the plant is large enough. ¬†Avoid watering in the evenings and try not to wet the leaves, especially on cool, wet days where there is very little wind to dry them.

HOW TO MANAGE AN OUTBREAK OF BOTRYTIS

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What was a healthy plum tomato has been infected by Botrytiis and will rot and drop off the plant.

 If you find a plant that is badly infected with botrytis, remove it and destroy it carefully.  If you find a leave, flower or fruit which is infected, then you need to remove it by cutting it away from the main plant with a scissors or pruning shears, making sure that you disinfect your tools in between each plant treatment. I use a mild bleach solution for this.  I also use a damp cloth to hold around the infected piece so as to help stop the spores from dispersing into the air and infecting surrounding plants.

This is a leaf of a healthy tomato plant with the infected Botrytis flower buds lying on top after falling from an infected part of the plant

This is a leaf of a healthy tomato plant with the infected Botrytis flower buds lying on top after falling from an infected part of the plant

This is the infected flower buds after lying on a healthy leaf for a day or two which is now also infected :(

This is the infected flower buds after lying on a healthy leaf for a day or two which is now also infected ūüė¶

This is a tomato and stem that are both very badly infected with the Botrytis (Grey Mould) Unfortunately I didnt see the tomato until it had infected the stem as well as other parts of what was a healthy plant :(

This is a tomato and stem that are both very badly infected with the Botrytis (Grey Mould) Unfortunately I didnt see the tomato until it had infected the stem as well as other parts of what was a healthy plant ūüė¶

ORGANIC SPRAY

I use an organic mix of baking soda, horticultural oil, ( such as neem oil) and water to try and prevent further infection.  Spray all plants  that look like they have or are likely to have been infected by being in close proximity to Botrytis.  I also use it on areas that I have pruned.  The baking soda is known to help prevent diseases.  It also kills existing fungal spores on plant leaves.  The oil is used to help the spray stick to the plants.

This is my 1st year of trying this organic mix so I will let you know how it goes!

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BLOSSOM END ROT

When you see an ugly dark patch on the bottom of your tomato it is usually a sign of Blossom end rot which is caused by a calcium deficiency in the developing fruits. Don’t panic, it really doesn’t mean that all your hard work is for nothing and that with a few minor adjustments, you can hopefully have a great crop of tomatoes.

So what is this Blossom End Rot. ¬†Well it is caused by a lack of calcium in the developing fruits, this causes the cells to collapse in the area where the fruit has the most growth – the Blossom End (named because this is the end where the flower was, just in case you were wondering ūüôā ¬†) and this starts to rot. ¬†Tomatoes need large amounts of calcium for healthy cell growth and when this is not available it can put the plant, especially the fruits under stress as ¬†fruits are the last to receive adequate calcium, hence this is why it is the affected part!

Blossom End Rot :(

Blossom End Rot ūüė¶

CAUSE OF BLOSSOM END ROT

Blossom End Rot is usually caused by the plant being under water stress. ¬†This occurs when the plants soil is allowed to dry out and is then watered. ¬†Even if calcium is present in the soil it will not move through the plant properly unless adequate watering is applied. ¬†Too much or too little water will put the tomato plant under stress and the leaves will receive the water and calcium before the fruit which is where the problem begins ūüė¶ ¬† ¬†Always remember that over watering can be equally as bad as under watering.

Another cause of Blossom End Rot is over-fertilization.  This is due to using the wrong fertilizer where the nitrogen content is too high.  This will stimulate lots of green foliage for your plant, but will take away the important nutrients including calcium which is needed for developing fruits  This is another reason for always using a good organic tomato fertilizer which has the correct amount of nitrogen for growing healthy plants.

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SPLIT TOMATOES

Over watering after the soil has dried out can often cause split fruit

Over watering after the soil has dried out can often cause split fruit

This is something that I get on a regular basis, every year I have some lovely ripe tomatoes that split. ¬†WHY you ask. ¬†Well its usually because of fluctuations in the amount of water they get. ¬†This is harder when you are growing outside as you cannot control the amount of water that nature throws at them, but it does happen under cover as well. ¬†When a tomato gets a ‘glut’ of water in one go, it swells so fast that the outer skin (usually ripe) cracks. ¬†The main reason is that the outer skin becomes more fragile as the fruit begins to ripen.

The best….and only way to solve this problem is water regularly¬†and pick fruits that are ripe rather than leave them on the vine, as just one more day can cause the fruit to crack.

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TOMATO BLIGHT

Some of my tomatoes infected by blight a couple of years ago!

Some of my tomatoes infected by blight a couple of years ago!

Tomato blight is another nasty disease that affects tomatoes, along with many other plants and can be disastrous if it gets hold.  Once again, dont panic as there are things we can do to prevent it and also treat it if it does show its ugly head.

Blight is most common in tomatoes and potatoes and is usually caused by very wet weather, cool nights and warm days.  It is a fungus which spreads really fast over the whole plant including the fruits or tubers, thus causing them to decay.  This is a common problem in tomatoes grown outside as you cannot control the amount of water the plant is getting, it does however also affect tomatoes grown under cover, especially when there is long periods of damp, wet conditions enveloping the outside of the poly tunnel.

SYMPTOMS OF BLIGHT

Blight usually starts on the leaves of the plants but can very quickly effect the growing fruits which will quickly turn into a blackish brown hard rough surface.

HOW TO PREVENT BLIGHT FROM DESTROYING YOUR CROP

Leaf of a tomato which has blight

Leaf of a tomato which has blight

Similar to Botrytis, Blight can remain in the soil for a very long period of time.  For this reason I always rotate the crop and never plant my tomatoes in the same place more than once every couple of years.  Always remove any leaves that look suspicious, ie: any that are yellow, have dark brown spots or even a fungus (spores). Remove all fruits and leaves that are infected and also any fallen leaves that may be lying on the soil as these will only prolong and spread the disease further.

Water only at the base of the plant and avoid splashing water which will only spread the spores.  Water in the morning, never in the evening as the wet cool conditions are ideal for blight to grow.

Use Bordeaux mixture which is a copper based spray and is perfectly OK to use if your an organic gardener.  It is used to protect healthy plants but once blight is present it will not cure them.  It is only used as a preventative measure rather than a cure!!

Alternatively you could try a baking soda spray similar to the one I used for Botrytis.

I do hope that this information will help you to recognize the symptoms of some of the nasty problems that can occur. ¬† I have over the years, had all of these problems, sometimes all of them together. ¬†With some diligent hard work I have managed to control them and still get great yields. ¬†This year its Botrytis and it really has taken hold ūüė¶ I do blame myself for overcrowding the tomato tunnel. ¬†I have probably provoked the situation by not being able to open one of the doors for a couple of months. ¬†This has restricted the air flow on top of some really damp wet days and therefore the leaves on the tomato plants remained wet longer than they should have.

Please feel free to ask questions which I hope to answer for you and please watch the video which shows you the Botrytis in a little more detail.

Please don’t forget to subscribe to my you tube channel by clicking on the link below the video.

Happy Gardening

Eve

Green, Amber…..RED

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Hi Guys and welcome back to my blog. First of all I must apologise for not blogging for so long but we finally had some dry, yes dry and very warm weather here in Southern Ireland which we haven’t seen here for a very long time. ¬†It was such a welcome surprise BUT the watering became a very very long job. ¬†I know some of you will be thinking why am I not using a watering system, well I have used both overhead and ground level irrigation systems in the past in tunnels but as we have re-vamped them I didn’t manage to get them back into place before I started planted so I am watering everything, inside and out of the tunnels with the hose. ¬†Luckily we get our water from the mountain well so no shortage there. I am hoping to get catch up with my blogs over the next few weeks but thought I would share a few photos of my tomatoes which were taken today.

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COUER DE BOUEF (seeds from which I saved from a tomato from the supermarket)

TOMATO BERRY

TOMATO BERRY

SANTA MARIA (Another named by myself after staying in a hotel in Florence and saving the seeds from a tomato that I liked)

SANTA MARIA (Another named by myself after staying in a hotel in Florence and saving the seeds from a tomato that I liked)

I am growing over 20 varieties of tomatoes this year and have approximately 150 tomato plants of which most are doing really well ( as you can see from the pictures).  I have however, had a few problems which I will do  a separate blog on in the coming days to show you in more detail the different tomato problems that can occur and how you can resolve them!!

BARCELONA TOMATO (named by me as I saved the seeds from a tomato bought on holiday in Barcelona)

BARCELONA TOMATO (named by myself as I saved the seeds from a tomato bought on holiday in Barcelona)

TAMINA (masses of medium size tomatoes-very reliable)

TAMINA (masses of medium size tomatoes-very reliable and high yielding tomato)

SCATOLONE (massive meaty plum tomato)

SCATOLONE (massive meaty plum tomato)

Why Grow Your Own Tomatoes

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There is nothing nicer than growing your own vegetables and fruit but there is one particular vegetable…..well actually it is a fruit,that tastes better than anything you can buy in the supermarket……THE TOMATO!

Have you ever tasted a home-grown tomato? They are juicy, RIPE, tasty and VERY different from shop bought tomatoes….but why you ask…Well here are a few reasons why ‘GROWING YOUR OWN’ is better in every way:-

Shop bought tomatoes are usually picked when they are still green or maybe just a little red, treated with pesticides and chemicals to stop them from rotting so when they are in transit they will ripen slower and then they will be red and ready to eat when you buy them (even then they look very pale).  The longer the tomatoes are on the plant the more natural sugars form in the tomato making it sweeter but as they are picked before they are ready they usually are still quite acidic and taste bland with little or no flavour.

As the shop bought tomatoes are picked days or even weeks before they reach the shelves in the super market they start to lose their nutrients and the vitamin C level will be much lower especially as they are picked before they are ripe.

Home grown tomatoes have over 50% more vitamin C and over double the antioxidant levels which help fight diseases such as cancer.

What more do you need! So lets get growing those yummy toms!!!

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How To Plant Tomatoes

First things first. ¬†The most important thing to growing any plant is the soil that you are going to grow it in. ¬†If you have poor soil then you cant expect to get healthy plants…Common sense really!!

Tomatoes are not really fussy about soil but I always add some organic compost to mine, usually a grow bag or two.  If you have your own compost heap, even better.  Unfortunately mine is not very good at the minute as we are building some new compost bins.

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Always plant tomatoes where they will get lots of sun (wishful thinking!). Try and plant either early morning or the evening if the weather is warm so that they don’t get transplant ¬†shock.

Carefully take your tomato plant out of its pot (you might have to squeeze the pot slightly if there are lots of roots).  Make the planting hole deeper than you would normally do as we need to bury the tomato plant right up to the top few leaves, this will enable the plant to produce more roots along the stem and make a much stronger plant.

As tomatoes are hungry plants and need lots of nutrients you can add a couple of extra things into the bottom of the planting hole, although this is not essential and additional nutrients can be added if needed as the plant grows.

For magnesium, which promotes plant vitality and productivity, sprinkle 1 teaspoon of Epsom salts into each hole.Image

For Calcium, add a handful of crushed egg shells which helps prevent ‘Blossom End Rot’ which I will explain in more detail later on this blog.¬†Crushed Egg Shells

Now add a little organic compost into the planting hole before putting the tomato plant in.

Remember to take off all the ‘side shoots’/leaves right up to the top few.Image

Put the tomato plant into the hole so the lowest set of leaves is at soil level then fill the hole with the compost/soil.Image

Press the soil down around the plant gently but firmly to remove any air pockets, LABEL and water well.Image

As soon as you see the first ‘trusses’ (flowers) then you need to start feeding your tomatoes with a good quality tomato feed which is available from any good garden¬†center¬†and some super markets. ¬†There are alternative, cheaper home-made fertilizers to feed ¬†the tomatoes which I write about soon.

Hope that this information, along with the video will help you to plant your tomatoes successfully.

In my next blog on tomatoes I will explain a little more about nutrient¬†deficiencies¬†and will show you some photos as most tomato growing problems happens to the best of us…..INCLUDING ME!!

REMEMBER THAT TOMATOES  ARE HUNGRY FEEDERS AND NEED FEEDING EVERY WEEK, OR EVEN TWICE A WEEK DEPENDING ON WHERE THEY ARE GROWING!

(Please read the instructions on your tomato feed bottle).

There is so much more to this vegetable/fruit. ¬†I will help you along with growing your tomatoes and ensuring that you grow strong healthy plants and also what you can do with those yummy tomatoes, including, relishes, salsa, sauces, sun-dried, preserving including freezing etc etc etc…..Stay Tuned!!

How To Grow Tomatoes Part 3

Hi Guys
I have finally managed to plant some (100!) tomatoes into the poly tunnel now that I have new planters….still waiting to change over the old cover though but that’s for another day…..most important thing now is to get the tomatoes in.
As we have had a couple of good days of weather  I have also managed to do a video which will show you a step by step guide on how to plant your toms into their final planting position.  I have had a few technical problems with my upload but hopefully it will be up there on you tube today.
I will be putting a detailed guide here on my blog later on today so you will be able to read all the ‘dos and donts’ of growing tomatoes along with some pics of problems that can happen (even to me!!). This is my way of growing tomatoes and have always had great success….and so will you if you follow my simple instructions.
Must go now and plant up the rest of my toms and maybe get a few basket tomatoes in too!!
Eve

‘Crazy’ Weather!!

Hi Guys

Just a quickie……¬†haven’t forgotten you.

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(Cartoon from ‘Only In Ireland’ FB Page)

As you all know the weather is ‘Crazy’ for this time of year….in fact its crazy for any time of year especially here in the southwest of Ireland where we really do get all four seasons in 1 day.

Due to this on, off, wet, dry, windy, sunny, hail, snow (only kidding) weather it has been a little difficult to really get stuck into the gardening.  I have managed however, to do a little bit of harvesting of the Cauliflowers, cabbages and purple broccoli.  Some of which I have managed to blanch and freeze to keep nice and fresh and hold on to those all important vitamins which deplete very fast if not cooked or preserved quickly after harvest.

Today I am hoping (as the wind and rain races past my window) to get some tomatoes into the ground and do a little video so that you will all know what to do to get some delicious tomatoes in a few weeks…..¬†that’s¬†if we are ‘blessed’ with some sunshine which is a necessity for ripening tomatoes.

So stay tuned and I will ‘upload’ a video and a detailed blog on how to plant your tomatoes into their final planting position, whether in a tunnel or greenhouse, in the ground, raised border in container.

Thanks

Eve